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JUUL Gets One Last Gasp With Emergency Relief Order

As expected, the manufacturer of JUUL electronic cigarettes, filed an emergency relief order following the FDA’s decision to ban sales in the U.S.

Late last week, a federal appeals court issued a temporary stay on the government ban. That means for the time being, JUUL devices and cartridges are still available in stores.

That leaves JUUL breathing a sigh of relief, but it could be short-lived.  The hold gives judges until July 12 to further review the case. The court issued a statement on the action it took.

“The purpose of this administrative stay is to give the court sufficient opportunity to consider petitioner’s forthcoming emergency motion for stay pending court review,” the court order said, “and should not be construed in any way as a ruling on the merits of that motion.”

JUUL has taken heat for the surge in young adults vaping. The government along with medical experts believe the e-cigs present serious health risks and were purposely marketed to teens.

The attempt at a total ban was aimed at JUUL, but put the industry as a whole on notice. When e-cigs came on the scene, they were touted as a safer alternative to smoking. But in reality, experts believe, the vapes actually hooked teens on nicotine.

Although JUUL is still on store shelves today, customers are already looking for new options. By the time the ban was issued, JUUL had dropped to the number four in popularity among middle and high school students.

In March, the FDA and the CDC released its jointly-published 2021 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Polling youths and young adults about their habits and preferences, the survey found JUUL was already losing favor. 

The disposable e-cigarette Puff Bar was now the top choice with teens, followed by Vuse and Smok as the second and third most popular vapes.

Immediately follow the government ban last week, the San Fransisco-based JUUL filed its motion with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to pause what it called an “extraordinary and unlawful” action. 

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